Members of the Black Leggings Society, all combat veterans of different wars, wait to enter the arena to dance on the second day of the ceremony remembering the Kiowa tribe's veterans, on Sunday, October 12, 2014.   Each year, the 'Ton-Kon-Gah' - the Black Leggings Society of the Kiowa tribe - gather in a ceremony to remember those who have served in the armed forces in the various foreign wars. It is a tradition that is almost as old as the tribe itself, and is different from other veterans societies in the way their veterans are remembered, from their dress, to their dances. Over a weekend in the fall, new members are initiated whilst older members lead the way, and the community of the Kiowa tribe come out to remember their war veterans. 
       
     
 To view the full project, visit Al Jazeera America:  The Native American Veteran
       
     
 Latonya "Tasha" Johnson, 35, sits at the dining table with the burial flag of her former husband Staff Sergeant Lonnie A. Watts, at their home in Rock Springs, New Mexico, on Sunday, March 9, 2014. Mr. Watts was deployed to Afghanistan after the start of the US-led invasion with the 82nd Airborne, an airborne infantry division and was later deployed to Iraq in 2005. Ms. Johnson believes that her husband, whom she met after he returned from Afghanistan, was deeply affected by what he'd experienced in combat there, but refused to seek help or counseling to get diagnosed with PTSD because it was something "[he] was not proud of." Mr. Watts turned to alcoholism to deal with the trauma and according to Ms. Johnson, always needed an adrenaline rush. Ms. Johnson says she wishes her husband could have sought counseling so that he would be alive today to help her raise their five children. 
       
     
 Specialist Michael Sankadota, 30, counts his daily dose of pills taken to alleviate the symptoms of his traumatic brain injuries sustained by IEDs and roadside bombs during his deployments to Iraq. The most grave of symptoms are his intense migraines, which has rendered him 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs, and in the care of his wife Nikki. The pills he takes are often ineffective, but include doses for anxiety, which exacerbate his migraines. Anadarko, Oklahoma, Thursday, October 9, 2014.
       
     
 Specialist Michael Sankadota pauses and winces with an intense migraine whilst building a teepee near Anadarko, Oklahoma, on Friday, October 10, 2014. Physical activity often brings on intense migraines for Specialist Sankadota, 30, with the migraines being rated from 1-10. Mr. Sankadota was deemed 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs as a result of the traumatic brain injuries he has sustained whilst on tour in Iraq. 
       
     
 The grave of Staff Sergeant Lonnie A. Watts of the 82nd Airborne Division is seen at the Veterans Cemetery in Fort Defiance, Arizona, on Monday, March 10, 2014. SSG Watts served in both Afghanistan and Iraq but never sought counseling for PTSD because it was something "[he] was not proud of," according to his wife Latonya Johnson. 
       
     
 Warren Queton, a veteran of Iraq, lights a cigarette before the start of the second day of the ceremony remembering the Kiowa tribe's veterans, on Sunday, October 12, 2014 near Anadarko, OK.  
       
     
 Retired SFC Mitchelene Big Man, accompanied by her children, sings during a church service in Pueblo, CO on Sunday, June 15, 2014. SFC Big Man is originally from Crow Nation, Montana, and is a veteran of Iraq and the founder of Native American Women Warriors, an organization aimed at raising awareness about women veterans and Native American women veterans in particular. The Color Guard, which is the group of dancers representing the NAWW, often performs in powwows and events relating to veterans and Native Americans. 
       
     
 Aided by her daughter Tia, 17, Retired Sergeant First Class Mitchelene Big Man, 49, is cleansed with smoke from sage in a ritual before getting dressed for a performance in Pueblo, Colorado, on Saturday, June 14, 2014. 
       
     
 Members of the Kiowa Black Leggings Society have a discussion about what it means to be a veteran before the start of the ceremony remembering those who fought, as seen on Saturday, October 11, 2014. 
       
     
 Singers drum to the beat of a tribal song during the ceremony remembering the veterans of the Kiowa tribe during their annual Black Leggings Society gathering near Anadarko, OK on Saturday, October 11, 2014. 
       
     
 A detail of the head regalia worn by the Black Leggings members during the second day of the ceremony remembering the Kiowa veterans, on Sunday, October 12, 2014. 
       
     
 Specialist Michael Sankadota watches on as well wishers, family, and friends pass the newly initiated Black Leggings members, often giving gifts and money, as seen on Saturday, October 11, 2014.
       
     
 Retired Sergeant First Class Mitchelene Big Man, 49, prepares her headdress with the help of her daughter Tia before a performance in Pueblo, Colorado, on Saturday, June 14, 2014. 
       
     
 Retired Sergeant First Class Mitchelene Big Man, 49, plays with her adopted son David, 5, as Joey, 4, looks on at home in Pueblo, Colorado, on Friday, June 13, 2014. SFC Big Man, originally from Crow Nation, Montana, is a veteran of Iraq and the founder of Native American Women Warriors, an organization aimed at raising awareness about women veterans and Native American women veterans in particular. She and her husband Dwayne Cyrus started the process of adoption of four children from Big Man's relative a year earlier. 
       
     
 Latonya "Tasha" Johnson, 35, wakes at 5.30am on weekdays to prepare herself and her children for the day, on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, in Rock Springs, New Mexico. Pictured here is Ms. Johnson with her son Landon, 6, who was having a difficult morning and claimed he was sick, and her daughter Ashley, 8. Ms. Johnson says that the lack of time has prevented her from taking her younger children to counseling and that she knows they may not be able to verbally communicate how they feel about their father's death. Ms. Johnson's former husband Staff Sergeant Lonnie A. Watts, who died in October 2013, left Latonya to take care of their five children, the youngest of whom was born after he died. Mr. Watts was deployed to Afghanistan after the start of the US-led invasion with the 82nd Airborne, an airborne infantry division and was later deployed to Iraq in 2005. Ms. Johnson believes that her husband, whom she met after he returned from Afghanistan, was deeply affected by what he'd experienced in combat there, but refused to seek help or counseling to get diagnosed with PTSD because it was something "[he] was not proud of." Mr. Watts turned to alcoholism to deal with the trauma and according to Ms. Johnson, always needed an adrenaline rush. Ms. Johnson says she wishes her husband could have sought counseling so that he would be alive today to help her raise their five children. 
       
     
 Jeremiah Martinez, 14, sits amongst household items during spring cleaning at home in Rock Springs, NM, on Tuesday, April 8, 2014. Jeremiah is Latonya (Tasha) Johnson's second son from her previous relationship, and was mostly raised by Staff Sergeant Lonnie Watts. Of Jeremiah, Tasha said "I know Jeremiah is really hurting the most right now, because of how much he looked up to Lonnie. He was the one who mimicked everything Lonnie did."  
       
     
 Friends and relatives of Edmond A. Harjo, a Seminole Code Talker who served in Europe during World War II as a Private First Class, attend his funeral on Friday, April 4, 2014 at the Swearingen Funeral Home in Seminole, Oklahoma. Mr. Harjo returned to the US after active duty in 1944 and remained in Maud, a nearby town, until his death at 96 on Monday, March 31, 2014. A video of Mr. Harjo played on the screen during funeral services. He was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2013 for his efforts in using his language during the war. 
       
     
 Edmond A. Harjo, a Seminole Code Talker who served in Europe during World War II as a Private First Class, is seen in his casket before a wake service on Thursday, April 3, 2014 at the Swearingen Funeral Home in Seminole, Oklahoma. Mr. Harjo returned to the US after active duty in 1944 and remained in Maud, a nearby town, until his death at 96 on Monday, March 31, 2014. 
       
     
 A soldier presents the folded American flag of a deceased veteran to next of kin, Rick Harjo, during funeral services for his uncle, Edmond A. Harjo in Seminole, Oklahoma, on Friday, April 4, 2014. Mr. Harjo was a Seminole Code Talker who served in Europe during World War II as a Private First Class and returned to the US after active duty in 1944 and remained in Maud, a nearby town, until his death at 96 on Monday, March 31, 2014. He was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2013 for his efforts in using his language during the war. He was buried in the new veterans memorial grounds on the Seminole Nation and was given a small military funeral. 
       
     
 Friends and relatives carry the casket containing the body of Edmond A. Harjo during funeral services on Friday, April 4, 2014 in Seminole, Oklahoma. 
       
     
 Friends and relatives gather around the casket containing the body of Edmond A. Harjo during a prayer on Friday, April 4, 2014 in Seminole, Oklahoma.
       
     
 Members of the Black Leggings Society, all combat veterans of different wars, wait to enter the arena to dance on the second day of the ceremony remembering the Kiowa tribe's veterans, on Sunday, October 12, 2014.   Each year, the 'Ton-Kon-Gah' - the Black Leggings Society of the Kiowa tribe - gather in a ceremony to remember those who have served in the armed forces in the various foreign wars. It is a tradition that is almost as old as the tribe itself, and is different from other veterans societies in the way their veterans are remembered, from their dress, to their dances. Over a weekend in the fall, new members are initiated whilst older members lead the way, and the community of the Kiowa tribe come out to remember their war veterans. 
       
     

Members of the Black Leggings Society, all combat veterans of different wars, wait to enter the arena to dance on the second day of the ceremony remembering the Kiowa tribe's veterans, on Sunday, October 12, 2014. 

Each year, the 'Ton-Kon-Gah' - the Black Leggings Society of the Kiowa tribe - gather in a ceremony to remember those who have served in the armed forces in the various foreign wars. It is a tradition that is almost as old as the tribe itself, and is different from other veterans societies in the way their veterans are remembered, from their dress, to their dances. Over a weekend in the fall, new members are initiated whilst older members lead the way, and the community of the Kiowa tribe come out to remember their war veterans. 

 To view the full project, visit Al Jazeera America:  The Native American Veteran
       
     

To view the full project, visit Al Jazeera America: The Native American Veteran

 Latonya "Tasha" Johnson, 35, sits at the dining table with the burial flag of her former husband Staff Sergeant Lonnie A. Watts, at their home in Rock Springs, New Mexico, on Sunday, March 9, 2014. Mr. Watts was deployed to Afghanistan after the start of the US-led invasion with the 82nd Airborne, an airborne infantry division and was later deployed to Iraq in 2005. Ms. Johnson believes that her husband, whom she met after he returned from Afghanistan, was deeply affected by what he'd experienced in combat there, but refused to seek help or counseling to get diagnosed with PTSD because it was something "[he] was not proud of." Mr. Watts turned to alcoholism to deal with the trauma and according to Ms. Johnson, always needed an adrenaline rush. Ms. Johnson says she wishes her husband could have sought counseling so that he would be alive today to help her raise their five children. 
       
     

Latonya "Tasha" Johnson, 35, sits at the dining table with the burial flag of her former husband Staff Sergeant Lonnie A. Watts, at their home in Rock Springs, New Mexico, on Sunday, March 9, 2014. Mr. Watts was deployed to Afghanistan after the start of the US-led invasion with the 82nd Airborne, an airborne infantry division and was later deployed to Iraq in 2005. Ms. Johnson believes that her husband, whom she met after he returned from Afghanistan, was deeply affected by what he'd experienced in combat there, but refused to seek help or counseling to get diagnosed with PTSD because it was something "[he] was not proud of." Mr. Watts turned to alcoholism to deal with the trauma and according to Ms. Johnson, always needed an adrenaline rush. Ms. Johnson says she wishes her husband could have sought counseling so that he would be alive today to help her raise their five children. 

 Specialist Michael Sankadota, 30, counts his daily dose of pills taken to alleviate the symptoms of his traumatic brain injuries sustained by IEDs and roadside bombs during his deployments to Iraq. The most grave of symptoms are his intense migraines, which has rendered him 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs, and in the care of his wife Nikki. The pills he takes are often ineffective, but include doses for anxiety, which exacerbate his migraines. Anadarko, Oklahoma, Thursday, October 9, 2014.
       
     

Specialist Michael Sankadota, 30, counts his daily dose of pills taken to alleviate the symptoms of his traumatic brain injuries sustained by IEDs and roadside bombs during his deployments to Iraq. The most grave of symptoms are his intense migraines, which has rendered him 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs, and in the care of his wife Nikki. The pills he takes are often ineffective, but include doses for anxiety, which exacerbate his migraines. Anadarko, Oklahoma, Thursday, October 9, 2014.

 Specialist Michael Sankadota pauses and winces with an intense migraine whilst building a teepee near Anadarko, Oklahoma, on Friday, October 10, 2014. Physical activity often brings on intense migraines for Specialist Sankadota, 30, with the migraines being rated from 1-10. Mr. Sankadota was deemed 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs as a result of the traumatic brain injuries he has sustained whilst on tour in Iraq. 
       
     

Specialist Michael Sankadota pauses and winces with an intense migraine whilst building a teepee near Anadarko, Oklahoma, on Friday, October 10, 2014. Physical activity often brings on intense migraines for Specialist Sankadota, 30, with the migraines being rated from 1-10. Mr. Sankadota was deemed 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs as a result of the traumatic brain injuries he has sustained whilst on tour in Iraq. 

 The grave of Staff Sergeant Lonnie A. Watts of the 82nd Airborne Division is seen at the Veterans Cemetery in Fort Defiance, Arizona, on Monday, March 10, 2014. SSG Watts served in both Afghanistan and Iraq but never sought counseling for PTSD because it was something "[he] was not proud of," according to his wife Latonya Johnson. 
       
     

The grave of Staff Sergeant Lonnie A. Watts of the 82nd Airborne Division is seen at the Veterans Cemetery in Fort Defiance, Arizona, on Monday, March 10, 2014. SSG Watts served in both Afghanistan and Iraq but never sought counseling for PTSD because it was something "[he] was not proud of," according to his wife Latonya Johnson. 

 Warren Queton, a veteran of Iraq, lights a cigarette before the start of the second day of the ceremony remembering the Kiowa tribe's veterans, on Sunday, October 12, 2014 near Anadarko, OK.  
       
     

Warren Queton, a veteran of Iraq, lights a cigarette before the start of the second day of the ceremony remembering the Kiowa tribe's veterans, on Sunday, October 12, 2014 near Anadarko, OK.  

 Retired SFC Mitchelene Big Man, accompanied by her children, sings during a church service in Pueblo, CO on Sunday, June 15, 2014. SFC Big Man is originally from Crow Nation, Montana, and is a veteran of Iraq and the founder of Native American Women Warriors, an organization aimed at raising awareness about women veterans and Native American women veterans in particular. The Color Guard, which is the group of dancers representing the NAWW, often performs in powwows and events relating to veterans and Native Americans. 
       
     

Retired SFC Mitchelene Big Man, accompanied by her children, sings during a church service in Pueblo, CO on Sunday, June 15, 2014. SFC Big Man is originally from Crow Nation, Montana, and is a veteran of Iraq and the founder of Native American Women Warriors, an organization aimed at raising awareness about women veterans and Native American women veterans in particular. The Color Guard, which is the group of dancers representing the NAWW, often performs in powwows and events relating to veterans and Native Americans. 

 Aided by her daughter Tia, 17, Retired Sergeant First Class Mitchelene Big Man, 49, is cleansed with smoke from sage in a ritual before getting dressed for a performance in Pueblo, Colorado, on Saturday, June 14, 2014. 
       
     

Aided by her daughter Tia, 17, Retired Sergeant First Class Mitchelene Big Man, 49, is cleansed with smoke from sage in a ritual before getting dressed for a performance in Pueblo, Colorado, on Saturday, June 14, 2014. 

 Members of the Kiowa Black Leggings Society have a discussion about what it means to be a veteran before the start of the ceremony remembering those who fought, as seen on Saturday, October 11, 2014. 
       
     

Members of the Kiowa Black Leggings Society have a discussion about what it means to be a veteran before the start of the ceremony remembering those who fought, as seen on Saturday, October 11, 2014. 

 Singers drum to the beat of a tribal song during the ceremony remembering the veterans of the Kiowa tribe during their annual Black Leggings Society gathering near Anadarko, OK on Saturday, October 11, 2014. 
       
     

Singers drum to the beat of a tribal song during the ceremony remembering the veterans of the Kiowa tribe during their annual Black Leggings Society gathering near Anadarko, OK on Saturday, October 11, 2014. 

 A detail of the head regalia worn by the Black Leggings members during the second day of the ceremony remembering the Kiowa veterans, on Sunday, October 12, 2014. 
       
     

A detail of the head regalia worn by the Black Leggings members during the second day of the ceremony remembering the Kiowa veterans, on Sunday, October 12, 2014. 

 Specialist Michael Sankadota watches on as well wishers, family, and friends pass the newly initiated Black Leggings members, often giving gifts and money, as seen on Saturday, October 11, 2014.
       
     

Specialist Michael Sankadota watches on as well wishers, family, and friends pass the newly initiated Black Leggings members, often giving gifts and money, as seen on Saturday, October 11, 2014.

 Retired Sergeant First Class Mitchelene Big Man, 49, prepares her headdress with the help of her daughter Tia before a performance in Pueblo, Colorado, on Saturday, June 14, 2014. 
       
     

Retired Sergeant First Class Mitchelene Big Man, 49, prepares her headdress with the help of her daughter Tia before a performance in Pueblo, Colorado, on Saturday, June 14, 2014. 

 Retired Sergeant First Class Mitchelene Big Man, 49, plays with her adopted son David, 5, as Joey, 4, looks on at home in Pueblo, Colorado, on Friday, June 13, 2014. SFC Big Man, originally from Crow Nation, Montana, is a veteran of Iraq and the founder of Native American Women Warriors, an organization aimed at raising awareness about women veterans and Native American women veterans in particular. She and her husband Dwayne Cyrus started the process of adoption of four children from Big Man's relative a year earlier. 
       
     

Retired Sergeant First Class Mitchelene Big Man, 49, plays with her adopted son David, 5, as Joey, 4, looks on at home in Pueblo, Colorado, on Friday, June 13, 2014. SFC Big Man, originally from Crow Nation, Montana, is a veteran of Iraq and the founder of Native American Women Warriors, an organization aimed at raising awareness about women veterans and Native American women veterans in particular. She and her husband Dwayne Cyrus started the process of adoption of four children from Big Man's relative a year earlier. 

 Latonya "Tasha" Johnson, 35, wakes at 5.30am on weekdays to prepare herself and her children for the day, on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, in Rock Springs, New Mexico. Pictured here is Ms. Johnson with her son Landon, 6, who was having a difficult morning and claimed he was sick, and her daughter Ashley, 8. Ms. Johnson says that the lack of time has prevented her from taking her younger children to counseling and that she knows they may not be able to verbally communicate how they feel about their father's death. Ms. Johnson's former husband Staff Sergeant Lonnie A. Watts, who died in October 2013, left Latonya to take care of their five children, the youngest of whom was born after he died. Mr. Watts was deployed to Afghanistan after the start of the US-led invasion with the 82nd Airborne, an airborne infantry division and was later deployed to Iraq in 2005. Ms. Johnson believes that her husband, whom she met after he returned from Afghanistan, was deeply affected by what he'd experienced in combat there, but refused to seek help or counseling to get diagnosed with PTSD because it was something "[he] was not proud of." Mr. Watts turned to alcoholism to deal with the trauma and according to Ms. Johnson, always needed an adrenaline rush. Ms. Johnson says she wishes her husband could have sought counseling so that he would be alive today to help her raise their five children. 
       
     

Latonya "Tasha" Johnson, 35, wakes at 5.30am on weekdays to prepare herself and her children for the day, on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, in Rock Springs, New Mexico. Pictured here is Ms. Johnson with her son Landon, 6, who was having a difficult morning and claimed he was sick, and her daughter Ashley, 8. Ms. Johnson says that the lack of time has prevented her from taking her younger children to counseling and that she knows they may not be able to verbally communicate how they feel about their father's death. Ms. Johnson's former husband Staff Sergeant Lonnie A. Watts, who died in October 2013, left Latonya to take care of their five children, the youngest of whom was born after he died. Mr. Watts was deployed to Afghanistan after the start of the US-led invasion with the 82nd Airborne, an airborne infantry division and was later deployed to Iraq in 2005. Ms. Johnson believes that her husband, whom she met after he returned from Afghanistan, was deeply affected by what he'd experienced in combat there, but refused to seek help or counseling to get diagnosed with PTSD because it was something "[he] was not proud of." Mr. Watts turned to alcoholism to deal with the trauma and according to Ms. Johnson, always needed an adrenaline rush. Ms. Johnson says she wishes her husband could have sought counseling so that he would be alive today to help her raise their five children. 

 Jeremiah Martinez, 14, sits amongst household items during spring cleaning at home in Rock Springs, NM, on Tuesday, April 8, 2014. Jeremiah is Latonya (Tasha) Johnson's second son from her previous relationship, and was mostly raised by Staff Sergeant Lonnie Watts. Of Jeremiah, Tasha said "I know Jeremiah is really hurting the most right now, because of how much he looked up to Lonnie. He was the one who mimicked everything Lonnie did."  
       
     

Jeremiah Martinez, 14, sits amongst household items during spring cleaning at home in Rock Springs, NM, on Tuesday, April 8, 2014. Jeremiah is Latonya (Tasha) Johnson's second son from her previous relationship, and was mostly raised by Staff Sergeant Lonnie Watts. Of Jeremiah, Tasha said "I know Jeremiah is really hurting the most right now, because of how much he looked up to Lonnie. He was the one who mimicked everything Lonnie did."  

 Friends and relatives of Edmond A. Harjo, a Seminole Code Talker who served in Europe during World War II as a Private First Class, attend his funeral on Friday, April 4, 2014 at the Swearingen Funeral Home in Seminole, Oklahoma. Mr. Harjo returned to the US after active duty in 1944 and remained in Maud, a nearby town, until his death at 96 on Monday, March 31, 2014. A video of Mr. Harjo played on the screen during funeral services. He was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2013 for his efforts in using his language during the war. 
       
     

Friends and relatives of Edmond A. Harjo, a Seminole Code Talker who served in Europe during World War II as a Private First Class, attend his funeral on Friday, April 4, 2014 at the Swearingen Funeral Home in Seminole, Oklahoma. Mr. Harjo returned to the US after active duty in 1944 and remained in Maud, a nearby town, until his death at 96 on Monday, March 31, 2014. A video of Mr. Harjo played on the screen during funeral services. He was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2013 for his efforts in using his language during the war. 

 Edmond A. Harjo, a Seminole Code Talker who served in Europe during World War II as a Private First Class, is seen in his casket before a wake service on Thursday, April 3, 2014 at the Swearingen Funeral Home in Seminole, Oklahoma. Mr. Harjo returned to the US after active duty in 1944 and remained in Maud, a nearby town, until his death at 96 on Monday, March 31, 2014. 
       
     

Edmond A. Harjo, a Seminole Code Talker who served in Europe during World War II as a Private First Class, is seen in his casket before a wake service on Thursday, April 3, 2014 at the Swearingen Funeral Home in Seminole, Oklahoma. Mr. Harjo returned to the US after active duty in 1944 and remained in Maud, a nearby town, until his death at 96 on Monday, March 31, 2014. 

 A soldier presents the folded American flag of a deceased veteran to next of kin, Rick Harjo, during funeral services for his uncle, Edmond A. Harjo in Seminole, Oklahoma, on Friday, April 4, 2014. Mr. Harjo was a Seminole Code Talker who served in Europe during World War II as a Private First Class and returned to the US after active duty in 1944 and remained in Maud, a nearby town, until his death at 96 on Monday, March 31, 2014. He was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2013 for his efforts in using his language during the war. He was buried in the new veterans memorial grounds on the Seminole Nation and was given a small military funeral. 
       
     

A soldier presents the folded American flag of a deceased veteran to next of kin, Rick Harjo, during funeral services for his uncle, Edmond A. Harjo in Seminole, Oklahoma, on Friday, April 4, 2014. Mr. Harjo was a Seminole Code Talker who served in Europe during World War II as a Private First Class and returned to the US after active duty in 1944 and remained in Maud, a nearby town, until his death at 96 on Monday, March 31, 2014. He was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2013 for his efforts in using his language during the war. He was buried in the new veterans memorial grounds on the Seminole Nation and was given a small military funeral. 

 Friends and relatives carry the casket containing the body of Edmond A. Harjo during funeral services on Friday, April 4, 2014 in Seminole, Oklahoma. 
       
     

Friends and relatives carry the casket containing the body of Edmond A. Harjo during funeral services on Friday, April 4, 2014 in Seminole, Oklahoma. 

 Friends and relatives gather around the casket containing the body of Edmond A. Harjo during a prayer on Friday, April 4, 2014 in Seminole, Oklahoma.
       
     

Friends and relatives gather around the casket containing the body of Edmond A. Harjo during a prayer on Friday, April 4, 2014 in Seminole, Oklahoma.